The Flash 2.16 “Trajectory” Top 5

Allison Paige as Trajectory [The CW]

Grant Gustin as The Flash [The CW]
Grant Gustin as The Flash [The CW]
Hey, there, speedsters! Did you enjoy your few weeks off? Did you spend them, like I did, catching up on some of your other favorite geeky things? Personally, I used the time to get caught up on Agent Carter, Legends of Tomorrow, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and season 2 of Daredevil. (Though I’m not quite through with that last one – no spoilers, please!) Nonetheless, I’m excited to get into the backstretch of this season’s The Flash, as the mystery of Zoom intensifies. Let’s get right into it, shall we? Here are my Top 5 things to talk about from episode 2.16, “Trajectory”:

#5: Barry Doesn’t Go Over the Edge

Well, OK, he did literally go over the edge of the canyon in the opening sequence, but I meant figuratively. The episode tiptoed right up to the line of Very Special Episode-land. (Drugs are bad, mmm-kay?) It was, honestly, getting a bit preachy, especially as Barry (Grant Gustin) and Wells (Tom Cavanagh) face off in the portal room. Fortunately, Barry resisted the temptation of V9 of his own volition, and we didn’t have to suffer through an intervention. Good thing, considering we see what happens when you “O.D.” on the stuff.

#4: Trajectory’s Costume

Allison Paige as Trajectory [The CW]
Allison Paige as Trajectory [The CW]
That’s good work by the show’s designers there, on the costume for Trajectory (Allison Paige) – a very cool, feminine look, but without being girly or flirty. I did think the cornrows were a little strange-looking, but they make a lot of sense – you don’t want your hair whipping in your face when you’re running faster than the speed of sound, after all. I also appreciated that they stayed consistent with the show’s design for other speedsters, and didn’t abandon the leather look for lycra just because it was for a woman. I foresee some cosplays featuring this look in the next few months.

#3: Journalistic Ethics Take a Beating

The B-plot of Iris’s (Candice Patton) conflict with her new editor, Scott Evans (Tone Bell), was just riddled with problems. I liked seeing Iris having to confront the dilemma of having inside information that she couldn’t use to prove that The Flash hadn’t turned rogue, but Evans’ direction to her on the story is wrong, too. Despite what he says, it’s not holding the powerful accountable when you rush the story. Ultimately, they both learn the wrong lesson. It’s not that it’s OK to believe in some heroes, or that there are some people who are beyond reproach. The proper lesson is that good journalism requires waiting for evidence, and that you shouldn’t bias your story by rushing to judgment, one way or the other.

#2: Plot Holes Abound

Alas, in the desire to give us a half-hearted after-school special, the writers got a little lazy on this episode. The whole point of Eliza Harmon being a scientist, is that she reverse-engineered Caitlyn’s (Danielle Panabaker) formula and created her own version of Velocity 9. So why, when she burns through her supply, does the voice in her head (apparently a side-effect of the Velocity formula, although we never saw any evidence of Jay suffering from a split personality) convince her to go steal it from S.T.A.R. Labs instead of, I don’t know, making more? For that matter, when she does break into the lab, she demands the V9, by name, even though she’s literally never heard that name before. I know I could harp on loose ends like this with almost every episode, but I really just sat there scratching my head on this one.

#1: The Pieces are Starting to Come Together

When Trajectory takes that fatal final dose of V9 and her lightning aura starts to turn blue, the team puts together that Zoom is sick, might even be dying. They of course jump to the wrong conclusion, that this means Jay is really Zoom, since Jay was sick from using Velocity. This is seemingly confirmed when Cisco (Carlos Valdes) has a vision of Zoom removing his mask to reveal Jay’s face. We, of course, know that it’s not as simple as that; Jay and Zoom and definitely doppelgangers, but not the same person.

But here’s where those pesky plot holes come into play again. Why doesn’t Caitlyn, at least, realize that Jay’s lightning aura was never blue, even when he used the V6, V7, or V9 formulas? Also, they speculate that what they witnessed in episode 2.14, namely Zoom killing Jay in front of their eyes, must be an optical illusion like the kind Thawne used in the first season. Here’s the major problem with that: presumably, Barry’s eyes, optic nerves, and brain all move as fast as his body can. They must, otherwise he wouldn’t be able to function at super speed. Why, then, is he susceptible to the double-vision trick? The whole gimmick relies on the fact that a speedster moves too fast for the human eye. Yes, I realize that this is a plot hole that goes all the way back to mid-way through season 1, so there’s no fixing it now, but it’s stuck in my craw now.


Don’t forget, Flash fans, next Monday (March 28) is the FlashSupergirl crossover on CBS! Check in here for Amelia‘s review next week, and I’ll hopefully be able to chime in with some thoughts as part of my review next Tuesday for episode 2.17, “Flash Back”. Stay tuned!

Chad Patten

Chad Patten

Chad is an all-around geek's geek. He's a software engineer, a science fiction lover, a comics fan, an actor, and a writer. His particular interests are The Flash, Doctor Who, Star Trek, Star Wars, and all things Marvel.
Chad Patten

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